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Learn Persian
Learn Persian

More sentences in Simple Present Tense

Quiz:
1- Listen to the audio files first (preferably once). Repeat it for a couple of times. Write it down on a paper. Find their English equivalents. (Seen)

One

One

Two

Two

Three

Three

2- Find the Persian equivalent for the following words and make four sentences with each of them (one in simple past tense, one in present perfect tense using ‘for’, one in simple future tense, and one in past perfect tense).

Summer
Next summer
Composition

3- Say these numbers in Persian:

728 – 112 – 9009 – 3111 – 4056 – 10262

4- Follow the examples, combine the letters, and make words using the given letters. You’ll have to change the big letters into the small ones whenever needed.

Friend <= /du:st/ < ==

Book <= /keta:b/ < ==

To give <= /da:dæn/< ==

To steal <= /dozdidæn/ < ==

Lady <= /kha:nom/ < ==

Light (Lamp) <= /la:mp/ < ==

Pencil <= /meda:d/ < ==

Present Simple Tense Starts Here

Quiz:
1- Listen to the audio files first (preferably once). Repeat it for a couple of times. Write it down on a paper. Find their English equivalents. (Seen)

One

One

Two

Two

Three

Three

2- Find the Persian equivalent for the following words and make four sentences with each of them (one in simple past tense, one in present perfect tense using ‘for’, one in simple future tense, and one in past perfect tense).

To catch
My younger brother
Kite
Jack’s friend

3- Say these numbers in Persian:

22 – 34 – 90 – 108 – 5000 – 5005 – 61111

4- Follow the examples, combine the letters, and make words using the given letters. You’ll have to change the big letters into the small ones whenever needed.

Friend <= /du:st/ < ==

Book <= /keta:b/ < ==

Kite <= /Ba:d ba:dæk/< ==

Plate <= /Bosh gha:b/ < ==

Cat <= /Gorbeh/ < ==

Mouse <= /Mu:sh/ < ==

White <= /Sefid/ < ==

Ball <= /Tu:p/ <==

More Sentences in Past Perfect Tense

Quiz:
1- Listen to the audio files first (preferably once). Repeat it for a couple of times. Write it down on a paper. Find their English equivalents. (Seen)

One

One

Two

Two

Three

Three

2- Find the Persian equivalent for the following words and make four sentences with each of them (one in simple past tense, one in present perfect tense using ‘for’, one in simple future tense, and one in past perfect tense).

To start
To finish
Job
To water

3- Say these numbers in Persian:

63 – 48 – 2222 – 1090 – 565402 – 67067

Past Perfect Tense

I hope all of you are doing well with the lessons and have made good progress.

Unfortunately, due to some reasons, I had to close the Persian samples page from this week. I am totally aware that this page has been one of your favorite pages since the very beginning. Please understand my situation and don’t get angry with me!

I have just added a link to my Links page, which has some great poems including ‘Fairies’ of Ahmad Shamlu in English. I am sure you will like it. You may find it on Links page this week.

All right,

As always for many weeks, let’s do the quiz first.

Quiz:
1- Listen to the audio files first (preferably once). Repeat it for a couple of times. Write it down on a paper. Find their English equivalents. (Seen)

One

One

Two

Two

Three

Three

Interrogative in Simple Future Tense

Before we start today, let me answer to one of your questions first.

Question:
In drills for week 15 under section A: my brother sold

How do I translate this?

I’m asking because if I translate this to ‘bara:daram foru:khtan’ and translate it back I get ‘My brother to sell’. On the other hand if I translate this to ‘bara:daram foru:khtam’ I will get ‘My brother I sold’.

Answer:
I am sure most of you know the answer. So, let’s answer to his question together before he sells his poor brother!

Delete /nu:n/ from the end of infinitives to make a verb in simple past tense.

Here, delete /nu:n/ from the end of /foru:khtæn/ to have /foru:kht/, which is a verb in simple past tense.

As you know, each verb has a suffix that represents our subjects. For example, if we put /mæ/ at the end of /foru:kht/ we will get /foru:khtæm/, which means /mæn foru:khtæm/ = I sold.

More Sentences in Simple Future Tense

Today, we don’t have a new lesson. Instead, we’ll have some more words to practice in single future tense. Please do the quiz first and then go to useful drills page for further work.

Quiz:
1- Listen to the audio files first (preferably once). Repeat it for a couple of times. Write it down on a paper. Find their English equivalents. (Seen)

One

One

Two

Two

Three

Three

2- Find the Persian equivalent for the following words and make eight sentences with each of them (one in simple past tense, negative in simple past, interrogative in simple past, one in present perfect tense, negative in present perfect tense, one using ‘for’, and one with ‘since’, and one in simple future tense).

To rent
Room
Electricity
To stop
To obey
Fish

3- Say these numbers in Persian:

14 – 4 – 44 – 16 – 67 – 103 – 131 – 19 – 0 –

Simple Future Tense

Quiz
1- Listen to the audio files first (preferably once). Repeat it for a couple of times. Write it down on a paper. Find their English equivalents. (Seen)

One

One

Two

Two

Three

Three

2- Find the Persian equivalent for the following words and make seven sentences with each of them (one in simple past tense, negative in simple past, interrogative in simple past, one in present perfect tense, negative in present perfect tense, one using ‘for’, and one with ‘since’).

Bridge
Ugly
Bad
Beautiful
Big
Small
To steal
To hurt

3- Say these numbers in Persian:

40 – 60 – 30 – 64 – 231 – 1364 – 64231 – 230460

All right,

So far, we have successfully learned simple past tense as well as present perfect tense. I think we are now ready to take another step in our learning. Today, we are going to learn a new tense, which is Simple Future Tense.

How to Translate ‘since’ in Present Perfect Tense

This week, I received another great site from one of your friends, which is absolutely helpful for all of us. This site gives you the chance to watch the masterpieces of Hafez poems with clear Persian writings, and at the same time listen to the audio sounds reading the same poem. You may find the site on our Links page today.

I have received a couple of messages from some of your friends who have problems printing the lessons. I will really appreciate if you kindly let me know about printing the pages. Do you have any problems with printing or not? If not, do you have any suggestions for your friends to solve their problems? Please let me know.

Quiz:
1- Listen to the audio files first (preferably once). Repeat it for a couple of times. Write it down on a paper. Find their English equivalents. (Seen).

One

One

Two

Two

Three

Three

How to Translate ‘for’ in Present Perfect Tense

Before we start today, let’s take a look at one of your questions.

… What’s the difference between “I went to the store” and “I have gone to the store?”

Answer:

I believe you should know the answer if you have studied the previous lessons carefully.

Anyway, who knows the answer? Try to answer the above question before I get angry with you, sorry, before I try to answer! You have one minute to explain it clearly to your classmate, giving its Persian translation.

Did you do it? Great!

Now let’s try together.

“I went to the store” is in simple past tense while “I have gone to the store” is in present perfect tense. Fortunately, the person who has asked this question knows this definition. So, where is the problem?

He has probably forgotten to put /he/ sound between the verb and the suffixes, which gives us a verb in present perfect tense. Here’s how:

present perfect t.

Hello everyone, how are you?

Today, I am going to change the mood a bit! I know this class is different from the routine ones, but I think we are in a big class where everybody has the right to participate in it by raising a question or something. This will bring us all together and we will find ourselves in a real class.

Last week I received a couple of messages and I think it’s not a bad idea to let you see them. Maybe some of you have the same feeling and my answers could be for all of you.

Message 1 (the complete message with no change)

Subject: I can’t hear a thing

Thank you for putting easypersian on the internet for free

present perfect tense

Hello everyone, how are you?

Let’s have a look at two messages before we start today.

Message 1
Dear Hassan H.

I am following your lessons since November. I have learned a lot since then, thanks to you.

When I was learning the letters, I looked for a way to remember all those “strange” signs in an entertaining way, thus I developed a little memory-game with all the letters. I send it to you in the attachment.

You need the shockwave plug-in from macromedia to play it (You may get it here), then just open the farsi-memory.html page in your browser. I hope you like it, you are free to do with it whatever you want, for example offer it to your pupils on your site.

Greetings

Assuna

Persian Lesson 16 – How to Say my, your, his, plus noun in persian

Hello = /sæla:m/.

Salam

Welcome = /khosh a:mædid/.

Khosh amadid

Last week we learned how to say ‘my friend’ in Persian. Today, we are going to learn some more.

Let’s see how we can say the followings:

My friend
Your friend
His/her friend
Its friend
Our friend
Your friend
Their friend
Wow! Seems a Herculean job! Isn’t it?

Don’t worry! I am here to simplify the rules for you!

We already know how to say ‘my friend’. This makes our job much easier today. Let’s try it again.

My friend = /du:stæm/.

We added to the noun, which is /du:st/. And we know that we should pronounce as /æm/ in most cases.

All right. Our problem is almost over.

Now I want to say ‘your friend’. I replace /æm/ sound with /æt/sound. I will say /du:stæt/.

So,

My friend = /du:stæm/.

Doostam

Noun + /æm/.

Your friend = /du:stæt/.

Doostat

Noun + /æt/.

Persian Lesson 15 – How to Say ‘my’ plus ‘noun’ in Persian

Hello everyone, welcome back!

Some of you seem curious about the total number of the lessons I’ll provide you with. Well, in one word, I don’t really know the answer! These lessons are not pre-written. So, the total number is not clear. I just write one lesson for each week whenever I am close to my computer! The only thing I can say now is that I will be with you as long as I have something new to tell you. No matter how many years the wait will take me, I will be waiting for you to talk and write to me in Persian. Teaching gives me a new life; fresh and strong.

After all, I have just owned my own domain name and my own web site! Don’t expect me to give up so easily! Will you?

Persian Lesson 14 – Delete Subjects of Your Sentences

Hello everyone, welcome back!

I hope you are enjoying the lessons. Please let me receive your suggestions. Your suggestions will bring a lot of change!

Today, we are going to take care of some new hints.

Hint 1 – As you have noticed, we have some letters after each verb when we want to combine verbs with the subjective pronouns. Look at the examples below:

I closed. You already know its meaning in Persian. Don’t you? It means /mæn bæstæm/. That’s what I am talking about. We have /mim/ after verb when the subject is /mæn/.

And this one: you closed. /to bæsti/. Here we have after verb, when the subject is .

Persian Lesson 13 – Start Making Sentences in S.P. Tense

Hello everyone, welcome back!

I hope all of you have been following the lessons patiently and step by step. As I have told you on and on, we are going to learn Persian from the very beginning. It will take us a while to find ourselves fluent. I think the quality is more important than the quantity. Don’t get impatient if you don’t find lots of words each week. Probably, many of you will give up if I put a lot of words and ask you to do a lot of work every week

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